Thursday, October 15, 2015

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - October 2015

What happened to autumn? We were having a nice cool spell at this time last month, but, suddenly, over the last couple of weeks, summer has returned with temperatures in the 90s F. The only saving grace has been that the humidity has generally been low, so it hasn't felt quite as hot as August. Still, it's really not what we expect in October.

Even though the temperature hasn't indicated it, fall is here and plants are beginning to prepare themselves for winter. At least what passes for winter here in subtropical zone 9a. 

We still have a few things blooming, so let's get right to that.


If it's October, then the goldenrod must be blooming.

And the yellow-orange marigolds are hanging in there.

My chrysanthemums, on the other hand, have been slow to get started this year.

Blue daze (Evolvulus glomeratus) is at its best in autumn.

October also brings some late blooms from 'Darcy Bussell' rose.

And from my ancient 'Caldwell Pink' polyantha.

Blue plumbago continues to be my most reliable bloomer throughout all the summer and autumn until first frost.

Shrimp plant is beginning to bloom well.

Hamelia patens, aka "hummingbird bush" or "Mexican firebush," is covered in the little red blossoms that attract the hummers.

'Black and Blue' salvia.

Red kalanchoe blooms in a pot on the patio table. 

Texas sage ( Leucophyllum frutescus) normally blooms in response to rain, which we haven't had in a while, but this one is responding to receiving water from a sprinkler.

Pineapple sage.

Jatropha. (Again, those drops of water are from the sprinkler - no rain.)

Yellow cestrum.

The coral vine continues to be a bee buffet.

Firecracker fern is still blooming in its pot on the patio.

Anisacanthus wrightii, another hummingbird and butterfly magnet, is beginning to bloom. 

Justicia 'Orange Flame' is a very well-named plant.

As is firespike (Odontonema strictum).

The leaves are falling steadily now. Unfortunately, we don't get the blazing colors that our neighbors to the north get. Ours just tend to turn dull brown and drop off the tree. There are a few trees, several of them non-native, that do provide some fall color, but it is not typical of our trees. One more reason to envy those areas that have the actual four seasons rather than our two - summer and pre-summer.
Thank you for visiting my garden this month and thank you to Carol of May Dreams Gardens for hosting us. Happy Bloom Day!

16 comments:

  1. How many beautiful blooms, Dorothy. We are getting ready for what will be this weekend's first frost in the Northeast. We have enjoyed very nice temperatures lately, lots of warm to cool days.

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    1. Our first frost is still a couple of months away if we hold true to form, and for the moment it seems like summer has gotten its second wind, although the weather people promise cooler temps next week. We'll see.

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  2. Beautiful blooms!
    Do you know if Firecracker Fern will grow from seeds? I 'stole' some seeds from a plant growing in front of a restaurant here. Shh! Don't tell anyone.
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. I don't know why it wouldn't. I mean it must have started from seed at some point, right? I've never tried it but Google could probably tell you how to germinate it.

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  3. Alas, in another three days I'll be depending on your blog and other southern blogs to tide me over the long winter flower snooze season. I always learn something new coming to your blog. Today it is "blue daze". Not that I can complain about our weather - it's been marvelous. Our leaves are coloring up nicely now, too.

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    1. There certainly are compensations for your shorter growing season. Winter may come earlier, but you do have those lovely fall colors.

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  4. You have some beautiful blooms, such a lovely variety :-)

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    1. But I don't have any of your wonderful zinnias! I really must remember to plant some next year.

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  5. Your blooms are beautiful Dorothy, especially your roses and that Justicia 'Orange Flame'! It is always a pleasure to visit-Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. The Justicia has been especially blazing this fall.

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  6. Your October blooms are lovely, Dorothy, in spite of your high temperatures and no rain. You have lots of tropical reds -- very warming to look at on this cold Northeast day! P. x

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    1. Orange and red seem to be the dominant colors in my garden. Not quite sure how that happened...

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  7. Every time I read about your weather it sounds just like my weather! Two weeks ago it started to feel like Fall. Then, the next week it went up in the 90s! It has finally cooled down again, but it was HUMID! Where I live in California, it hardly ever gets humid! I wilted right along with the flowers! I recently visited family in Pennsylvania and goldenrod was growing all over the place. It's not something I commonly see in my Zone 10b. I wonder if it even grows here. You always have nice color in your garden. Also, question for you... I know you grow Brugmansia. I have two in pots. One blooms like crazy. The other one which is in a pot, rooted itself in the ground (don't tell my landlord.. haha!) and it is growing like a monster, but doesn't bloom that often. The flowers are pure white where as the other one that blooms a lot is a yellow/orange color. I'm wondering if maybe it's because the white one is a different variety so it blooms less? Or maybe it has something to do with the fact that it managed to get itself into the ground... maybe it's too busy growing roots to make flowers! :)

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    1. It sounds like your brugs are different varieties. They do come in different colors, ranging from white, yellow, various shades of pink, etc. And they do tend to bloom at different times. Mine usually do their best blooming in the fall, but I have to admit that none of them have really done well this year.

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    2. Hmmm... They sure do smell good when they bloom! Thanks, Dorothy! Happy gardening! :)

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