Friday, July 14, 2017

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - July 2017

Summer has arrived with a vengeance in my part of the world. Heat and humidity prevail and make the days miserable for plants and for the gardener. But at least we've been having regular late afternoon showers to provide some relief. Still, the garden is definitely showing some stress, although many plants are still bravely sending out their blooms. Here are some of them.


The flame-shaped flowers of the flame acanthus (Anisacanthus wrightii) are drawing bumblebees by the dozens to sip their nectar.


Another bee and butterfly favorite is the Mexican sunflower (Tithonia).


This native sunflower continues to send out plenty of blooms, undaunted by the heat.


And if it is summer, then of course the summer phlox is in bloom.


July is hibiscus season.


This one is a particular favorite.


When I first saw this one early in the day, it was perfect and gorgeous, but by the time I got back out with my camera, it was already past its prime. That's the one bad thing about hibiscus flowers; they only last one day.


The Blackfoot daisies, on the other hand, stay pretty and fresh for a very long time.


The blue potato bushes that I added in the spring have been doing very well.


And, of course, 'Pride of Barbados' continues to do me proud.


The Duranta erecta has been in bloom for a while and the blooms are now giving way to the "golden dewdrop" berries that give the plant its popular name.


Bronze esperanza is full of blooms.


And so is its yellow cousin.


The gaillardias have been doing well.


Here's another slightly different one.


Yellow milkweed.


And orange milkweed.


The ornamental pepper that reseeded itself from last year is becoming more...ornamental.


Hummingbird bush (Hamelia patens).


Most of the roses are resting just now but 'Darcy Bussell' is still sending out blooms.


I do love portulaca for its ability to stand up to the worst that Texas summers can throw at it. You can see the bloom's similarity to the rose; thus, its popular name "moss rose".


Yellow yarrow.


Dwarf ruellia 'Katie'.


The funky little flowers of the buttonbush. They start out as creamy white but turn color as they age.


The pretty little blossoms of convolvulus 'Blue Daze' don't stay open for very long. By mid-day the petals are already folding for sleep. But while they are open, they brighten their spot next to my goldfish pond.  


Yellow cestrum, another butterfly favorite.


And finally, here's a delicate creamy pink water lily just after one of those late afternoon showers.

I'm so glad you decided to visit my garden and my blog this month. I hope you'll come back soon.

Thank you, Carol of May Dreams Gardens, for once again being our host this month.

Happy gardening and happy Bloom Day.

18 comments:

  1. All those hot summer colors, red, orange, yellow, and then just a touch of cool blues and purple - Perfect!
    Have a great week-end!

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    1. My summer garden is dominated by hot colors which just make the occasional cool ones more appreciated.

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  2. Wow, so many beauties! I love those little peppers that look like Christmas light bulbs. Your water lily looks just like a Monet. :-)

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    1. Those peppers are striking, especially when they finish turning all the way to red.

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  3. What a beautiful selection of flowers in the heat. And so much unfamiliar to me. I'm a portulaca fan, but haven't grown it in years (I am getting into lantana, though.) Happy GBBD to you, Dorothy!

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    1. My lantana, like my roses, is resting at the moment but will be in bloom again soon. It is another wonderful summer plant.

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  4. Love those buttons. So many lovely blooms. Happy GBBD.

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    1. The button bush is a wonderful native shrub, much loved by butterflies. And me.

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  5. Your blooms are looking wonderful despite the heat. I think my favorite is the Mexican sunflower. Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. Mexican sunflowers are favorites of mine as well. That's why I always have some in my summer garden.

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  6. I love how you have all the colors. The stress is evident in my yard too. I have to make my own showers. And now I may be on a 12 day jury case starting this week. So if you don't hear much from me for the rest of July it is because I had to chose my yard over blogging.

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    1. Oh, my! Well, good luck with jury duty. I've only been actually selected for a jury once, several years ago, and it was only for a couple of days. Doing 12 days would be tough, but I am glad there are people willing to do it.

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    2. I did not get selected. Apparently I said something one of the lawyers did not like. Going through the selection process was equal parts interesting and boring. I have to admit that I am relieved not to have to serve for 12 days!

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    3. There's nothing like sitting through several boring hours only to be told, "Okay. You are not our kind of juror. Goodbye!"

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  7. Texas! Bless your heart. I am in southern middle Tennessee and the heat is horrible here also. Your flowers look great and it gives me ideas as to what I need to be planting. My Mexican Sunflower is only about two feet tall this year. I guess it needs a little more time.
    I enjoyed your garden. Happy Bloom Day.
    Jeannie @ GetMeToTheCountry.Blogspot.com

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    1. I planted a dwarf form of Mexican sunflower this year. It gets about 4 feet tall as opposed to the full size 6 - 8 and it's much more compact. The full sized ones tend to sprawl and can fall over from their own weight when full of blooms. I like the smaller one a lot and will be planting it from now on.

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  8. The last photo is just gorgeous, Dorothy! You can feel cooler in spite of the heat just by looking at this water lily. Seeing your lovely hibiscus makes me regret not planting any this year, though the Japanese beetles have been so bad here the past few weeks they would have eaten all the blooms anyway. Always a treat to see what's blooming in your garden!

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    1. I've had a plague of beetles and grasshoppers that have stripped some of my plants this summer, too, including a 'Texas Star' swamp hibiscus. I've finally had to resort to using some pesticide - very sparingly. It's distressing to see a plant you've babied along for months destroyed overnight.

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