Saturday, December 14, 2019

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December 2019/Poetry Sunday: When the Winter Chrysanthemums Go by Matsuo Basho

When the Winter Chrysanthemums Go 

by Matsuo Basho (Translated by Robert Hass)



When the winter chrysanthemums go,
there's nothing to write about
but radishes.


~~~

My winter chrysanthemums have gone and I have no radishes. But there are a few other things I can write about.

The Meyer lemons, for example. They are ripe and ready to be picked, along with the last of the Mandarin oranges.  


The bounteous flowers of the loquat tree are mostly spent now, but they promise a plentiful crop of the delicious fruits next year.

We had a couple of nights of freezing temperatures in November and I would have thought that would be the end of my cape honeysuckle for the year, but it surprised me by surviving that and continuing to bloom.

Likewise, I thought the jatropha would be gone but it, too, has thrived and continues to bloom.

The flowers of the blue plumbago are sparser now but some are still there.

And the purple oxalis loves the cooler weather of fall and winter.

The loropetalum, first cousin to witch hazel, has been in full bloom for a while and its blooms are beginning to fade.

Several of the plants that I bought for winter blooms are resting at the moment but the pansies are still going strong.

 And, in the pot by the front entry, so are the cyclamen.

The pink Knockout rose is beginning to offer up some winter blossoms.

And the Carolina jessamine that will be in its glory in late January and February gives us just a taste of what is to come with a few flowers.

I have not bought any holiday bloomers this year except for some waxed amaryllis bulbs. Have you tried them? Allegedly, they are completely carefree because the waxed bulbs contain all the nourishment and fluid that the bulb needs to bloom. Well, so far mine are a disappointment, but perhaps they will still perform for me in the new year.

I hope everything in your garden is performing well, even if that only means it is resting for winter. Happy gardening and happy holidays to you. May your next year be your best one yet!

Thank you, Carol of May Dreams Gardens, for hosting Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day. 


20 comments:

  1. You have so much colour still, yet here we have white. As you point out, everything is at rest and waiting for the warmth of spring. We recently went to a holiday party and there were sprigs of holly on the tables. We brought some home and the dark green of the leaves contrasted with the red berries is delightful. Nature provides much better decorations that all the baubles, tinsel and bright lights China can produce!

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    1. I agree. Nature in all its glory needs no further embellishment and it offers all we need for our own decorations.

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  2. Nice pictures. Our plants are indeed resting for the winter winter blooms are kind of cool though. Happy gardening!

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    1. Our winters are mostly gray, brown, and green and I find those colors restful, but it's nice to have a splash of some brighter colors to accent.

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  3. Amazing that you still have pansies. I need to get out and do some pruning but we had plenty of rain a week ago and I have just been leaving the yard to the fairies. The poem says it all!

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    1. That poem does express the essentials of the garden in winter.

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  4. Even spent, the loquat flowers are attractive. I was surprised to see that you have Jatropha blooming too - I've tried it a couple of times in my zone 10b (some say zone 11) garden and it's repeatedly failed. I'm envious of the Loropetalum too, another plant I've repeatedly killed. Happy GBBD!

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    1. The jatropha is in a protected spot on the south side of my house where it gets plenty of our direct southeast Texas sunlight. The location has had much to do with its success, but if temperatures get into the 20s, it will die back and then grow from the roots in the spring.

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  5. Here in New York, our plants are resting, getting ready for spring. My pansies are still green, but not blooming. Soon enough, they will be gone It was nice seeing your blooms. I love Carolina jessimine, which I have seen in January bloom as far north as Charlottesville, Virginia. I look forward to more of your winter blooms, which will nourish me until April.

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    1. Blooms are a bit sparse at the moment and that's okay with me. I enjoy the pleasures of the winter garden.

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  6. I have never seen Loquat flowers before, so thank you for that! It's one of the shrubs whose leaves I absolutely love, but flowers...! Well, I learn something new every day. Now I want one even more!

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    1. The loquat blossoms when they are fully open are quite beautiful and they also have a wonderful scent. When the tree is in full bloom it perfumes the whole section of my garden where it lives.

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  7. You have wonderful blooms to write about! P. x

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  8. Carolina Jasmine is pretty ,never heard of it, is it hardy in warm and hot climatic regions ,I wish I had planted chrysanthmum saplings when it was season so to get enormous blooms by now but now I have to bring bloomed one from nurseries I guess. Jatropha is quite care free plant that gives enorous blooms throughout the year in our region.

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    1. Jessamine is native to subtropical and tropical areas of the Americas so I'm sure it would like your climate. Jatropha does well for me but it will die back in winter if we have unusually cold weather. Mine has done that a few times over the years that I've had it but it always comes back in the spring.

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  9. Beautiful!
    I don't understand the appeal of waxed Amaryllis bulbs. "Carefree" but all you have to do with regular bulbs is give a small drink of water maybe once a week - what is so hard about that? And anyway it seems to me that a wax coating is 'plant abuse' Thanks for letting me vent, and I hope yours do well for you!
    Have a great week and Merry Christmas!

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    1. I tend to agree with you about the waxed amaryllis, Lea. I had heard so much about them this year I had to try them, but so far I am not impressed and I think I would have done much better by planting bulbs.

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  10. Such a nice variety of color! Nice to see. My garden is under snow from November to April so alas I have no work in the garden currently. But we are headed to California for a week and will see plenty.

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