Monday, September 14, 2020

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - September 2020

Here in my zone 9a garden in Southeast Texas, we have finally begun to get some rain in the past week along with a noticeable moderation in temperatures. Unfortunately, the rain came too late for some of my plants. I have lost a number of plants this summer to the drought and heat; they were all plants that had been planted this year and had not had time to establish a sufficient root system to find the water they needed. Happily, I do have my old dependables that ignore adversity and just keep going.  

 

Things like Esperanza "yellow bells. 


Some of my roses gave up and stopped producing in the heat but the antique polyantha rose 'Caldwell Pink' is not bothered.


Evolvulus 'Blue Daze,' a very useful ground cover. 




Hamelia patens, aka hummingbird bush or Mexican firebush, of course.


The almond verbena is covered in these not very noticeable blooms but their scent is certainly noticeable. It is heavenly!


The purple oxalis has been resting during the summer but now it is beginning to come to life. It is at its best in autumn and winter.


And, of course, there are crape myrtles. In pink... 


...and watermelon red.


Blue plumbago.


Caesalpinia pulcherrima, aka Pride of Barbados or peacock flower. 


Evergreen wisteria.


The old cannas gifted to me by a lovely neighbor many, many years ago.


Jatropha.


 Coral vine.

 And if it is almost autumn, there must be asters.



The cenizo shrub, Texas sage, blooms in response to rainfall. It had not bloomed all summer until this week.

It has been a difficult year in so many ways, but in September we are still standing - both my garden and me. I hope your garden has flourished this year and that you and everyone you love is safe and well.

Happy Bloom Day.

(Thank you Carol of May Dreams Gardens for this monthly meme.) 


29 comments:

  1. These are very nice pictures. Gardening where you are is different from where I live in New York.

    Happy Bloom Day!

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    1. We are subtropical so, yes, very different from New York.

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  2. It looks as though your garden has done well despite the adverse conditions, Dorothy. This is a wonderful burst of colour to start my day. I am sure that as I am out and about this morning I will be seeing many New England Asters here, no doubt patronized by the last few hummingbirds still fattening up for migration. Our first frost was possible overnight. It is still dark, but I will check whether the neighbouring roofs are white as soon as there is light. Fall has arrived!

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    1. We are eagerly awaiting the arrival of fall. Temperatures are supposed to be in the low 90s today.

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  3. As I read through this, I thought of a co worker's daughter, who is moving shortly from just north of New York City to Austin. If she gardens, she is going to have a big surprise (yes, I know you aren't in Austin). Blue plumbago. Crepe myrtle. Almond verbena. I do love your flowers. And even asters.

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    1. Austin will be quite a change for a former New Yorker. I hope she likes it there.

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  4. So many pretty things! My favorite is the Texas sage.

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    1. I'm very fond of that Texas sage, too. I always look forward to its blooms. It usually blooms several times during the summer. It made me very happy to see it this week.

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  5. My roses pretty much gave up except for my polyantha The Fairy. I love that evergreen wisteria. Happy Bloom Day.

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    1. The wisteria is a favorite of mine. I love its wine-colored blooms.

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  6. Nice asters! I used to have 'Caldwell Pink' rose in my former garden. It was a dynamo.

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    1. It is a dynamo. In my garden it blooms essentially from April to December.

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  7. You have several plants I've considering adding to my Southern California garden, including Caesalpinia and Tecoma, although I'm a little concerned about the mature size of both. A crape myrtle's on my list too as I have two trees that regrettably need to come out this year (one dead and one half-way there). Happy GBBD!

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    1. In normal winters, both the Caesalpinia and Tecoma die back to the roots here which helps control their growth. Recently, they haven't died back all the way and the Tecoma has been pruned a couple of times a year to keep it in check. Both can top 10 to 12 feet and grow almost that wide here.

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  8. What an amazing garden you have. I'd love to expand my knowledge of flowering plants. We got a few last year from the Native Plant Nursery in Lake Jackson, and they are doing well. I also have crepe myrtles and cannas (also given to me by an old neighbor friend). Thanks for sharing your garden with us.

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    1. You are too kind. In truth, my garden is much less than amazing at the moment but it's surviving and for that I'm thankful.

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  9. All are beautiful, but my favorite is the purple Oxalis!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!

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  10. After enough years in one place, it becomes clear which are the dependables. We could use some of that rain!

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  11. I loved all the blooms..Texas sage blooms are so spectacular.It would be my pleasure if you join my link up party related to Gardening here at http://jaipurgardening.blogspot.com/2020/09/peacock-flower-beauty.html

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  12. Very pretty! Love it. The flowers give hope ... in the face of smoke in these parts. I like the crape myrtles in particular.

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    1. The flowers I'm featuring this month do give hope because they have hung on in spite of adversity, as we are all trying to do.

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  13. You got me with the very first picture, Dorothy. That Esperanza is stunning. P. x

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    1. Year in and year out it is always one of my favorites.

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  14. I am fond of purple flowers in general; the Oxalis is STUNNING. What a deep, beautiful color.

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    1. Me, too. In fact, I might say that purple is my favorite color.

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    2. Same! It is mine and my mom's favorite color. I am especially fond of those deep, bold purples.

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