Monday, December 15, 2014

Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day - December 2014

We are still waiting for that first killing frost here in my zone 9a garden in Southeast Texas. We normally expect it around the tenth of December but Jack Frost is tardy in touching us with his icy fingers this year. The result is that all of my blooms that I showed you on November Bloom Day and, indeed, most of the ones from October Bloom Day are still pretty much in place. There are only a few additions.

The loquat tree has been in bloom all month. I dug this seedling from my daughter's garden six years ago and planted it here. This is the first year that it has bloomed.

I have a couple of yellow Esperanzas. This particular one got cut back severely last winter because it had grown too large. I guess I discouraged the poor thing because it has been slow to bloom this year, but finally, here in December, it is putting on its first real flush of blooms. 

The ever-blooming azaleas are still...well, ever-blooming.

As are the cyclamen, of course.

And the violas.

The 'Radazz' Knockout roses are in bloom again, just in time for Christmas.

And several of these late-blooming brugmansia blossoms are still hanging on.

There's the Christmas cactus.

And the bromeliad.

But what would Christmas be without at least one poinsettia. It's so warm here that this one is enjoying the weather outside. I can only hope that by Christmas it will be cold enough that I'll need to bring it inside. I hate those 80 degree F. Christmases!
Visit our host Carol at May Dreams Gardens for a list of other gardens that are participating this December's Bloom Day. It's always a treat to see what gardeners around the world are growing each month.

Happy gardening and I hope that whatever holidays you celebrate at this time of year are joyous and peaceful. Most of all I wish you a New Year filled with all good things. 

28 comments:

  1. So envious of all your colour. My garden has completely shut up shop now. Send an 80 degree F Christmas my way please!

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    1. I just checked the weather forecast for next week and they're saying our highs will be in the 40s and 50s, so I may get my wish. If I could send you 80 degrees for Christmas, I most certainly would!

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  2. Ok, so why did everything my garden shrivel and go brown after the last cold snap we had. My garden looks so sad I can't bring myself to blog about it :-(

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    1. It's all down to microclimates, I would guess. Some of my tall plants, like the hamelias, got bitten on their tops by the light frost we had, but everything else, even the lower parts of the hamelias, is still going strong.

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  3. My iPad froze and wouldn't let me add how lovely your blooms look!

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  4. Your gardens are still looking like summer Dorothy! Our temperatures have dropped into the 30's and 40's so I love seeing all the color in your garden!

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    1. I'm looking and hoping for cooler weather next week, Lee. It really is abnormally warm here this week. but at least that does extend our bloom season.

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  5. Lovely blooms!
    Happy Garden Bloggers' Bloom Day!
    Lea

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    1. Same to you, Lea. Thanks for stopping by.

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  6. Wow! That's a very different brugmansia. Do you happen to know the name? Your garden is looking way better than mine, but I know what you mean about the 80 degree Christmas. Would like to at least be able to get some wear out of a sweater or two.

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    1. Unfortunately, I don't know the brug's name. I had a seed packet of mixed varieties which I sowed last year and this was one of them. The blossoms are different from any other brug I've seen.

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  7. How fantastic that you've got so much colour in your garden. There was lots to share. I particularly loved that Brug and the Azalea is lovely too.

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    1. Well, my colors really can't compare to the riot of hues in your Australia garden, but they are hanging on pretty well this season. The frost - should it ever come - will put an end to that.

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  8. We can always switch houses for the month of December, if you would like to have some snow and cold for a change! I love seeing what are houseplants where I live in upstate New York thriving outdoors. And, I can always dream of everblooming roses and azaleas. Thank you for visiting me. I loved all of your pictures! Alana (RamblinwithAM)

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    1. No doubt it would be great fun to have snow and cold - for a few days at least! You might find the heat and humidity a bit much as well. Funny how we fail appreciate what we've got, isn't it?

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  9. Your Christmas cactus is so stunningly bright! I also love the whimsical brugmansia. I don't have any in my garden (yet), but I always adore pictures of them on Texas gardening blogs. Maybe I'll try one next year.

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    1. Brugs should do well for you in your zone 8b garden, Rebecca. They do die back to their roots in winter (usually) but they'll come back strong in the spring.

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  10. You have a lot of wonderful color. The cactus and bromeliad are awesome.

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    1. It will soon be summer where you live in New Zealand, just as it will soon be winter here. And yet it still almost seems like summer here and so the colors linger.

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  11. Oh, I loved your brugmansia, I have always wanted to grow them but haven’t dared, they would need to spend winter outside as I have nowhere to put them in the winter – but I have heard that certain varieties are OK to grow in containers outside here in London so I might give it a go. Yours look absolutely lovely.

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    1. Many brugs do thrive in pots. Mine are all in the ground and when we get a cold winter, which only happens occasionally, they do die back to their roots, but I've never had one that failed to come back from the roots in the spring and bloom again the next year.

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  12. Lovely blooms. I was interested to see the flowers on the Loquat as I have never seen it blooming before. How old is it? I have some tiny plants that I grew from seed. I wonder how long I will have to wait to get flowers.

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    1. The loquat was a seedling when I dug it in 2008, so it is six years old. I've grown fruit trees from seed before and I know from experience that it can take a long time for them to bloom. A lemon tree that I grew took almost 20 years before it finally bloomed, so six years is actually pretty quick.

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  13. You have quite a lot of flowers for this time of year!

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    1. The warm autumn has allowed them to continue to bloom.

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  14. I agree with you on not caring for the 80 degree climate during the holidays. I remember my first year away from my hometown (Bethlehem, PA), I was living in Dallas, TX. It was Thanksgiving, and it was so warm that it just didn't feel like the holidays. Now, living in Southern California, I'm used to warmer weather, but I do like it at least a little chilly over Christmas. Very much enjoyed your blooms, Dorothy.

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    1. Thank you, Danielle, and it does look as though I'll get my wish. It's not going to be 80 degrees - only in the 60s, apparently. Acceptable, I guess.

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